Tag: my little pony

MLP Review: “It Isn’t The Mane Thing about You”

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Rarity is getting ready for a photo shoot for “Vanity Mare” with Photo Finish with emphasis on her mane. She goes around town enhancing business for the Flower Ponies, a Scottish pony selling fans, and Davenport (Quills and Sofas). However, Rarity’s mane gets messed up by some super sticky string from Pinkie Pie celebrating the Cake Twins’ one-year sneeze anniversary. (It’s Pinkie Pie. Don’t question it.)

They both go to Zecora for a mane conditioner and a magical cleaning potion. Of course, without labels to tell which is which after Zecora pointed out what Rarity should take, the potions get switched. (By the way, those asking about labels have a more legitimate point than those asking why Rainbow Dash didn’t try to fight off/fly away from Caballeron’s hench ponies in last week’s episode. That said, this is a cartoon and the switcheroo is as old a trope as time.)

So instead of a soft, bouncy mane; Rarity has most of her mane removed. Since a new potion would take a while, she frantically goes to her friends to help fix her mane with the expected results that they are not super effective. This hurts Rarity since after the switch, ponies appear indifferent to her presence and now she has to cancel photo shoot.

The rest of the Mane Six and Starlight remind her that her mane isn’t the main thing about her and bring up her accomplishments on the show. Rejuvenated, Rarity inspires many a fandom artist by shining from the inside out. Oh, that photo shoot did take place thanks to Rarity’s friends and Rarity ends up on the cover of Vanity Mare.

If there is one given about MLP over the years, Rarity episodes are usually on song and wind up some of the better episodes of the series. This is no exception. Rarity’s MO is to bring the beauty out in everything, so it’s understandable that she wold get distraught if she can’t bring it out of herself after this incident. That’s why you have friends to help bring it from the inside out. Of course, when Rarity sports the punk look, that sets the episode alight.

Just when you think Season Seven might have been tapering off a bit (not that it really has), here’s Rarity to get every pony energized again.

GRADE: A

StatManDan

Hasbro Reveals Two New My Little Pony Toys @ HASCON

From our friends at R&C, HASCON reveals.

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MY LITTLE PONY: THE MOVIE GLITTER AND GLOW PRINCESS CELESTIA

Princess Celestia rules over Equestria with a majestic glitter and glow! At 8-inches tall, this Princess Celestia pony figure has translucent pink wings decorated with gold glitter. Press her Cutie Mark to see a four different patterns of glowing LED lights! She comes with a tiara, necklace, and comb for brushing her beautiful pony hair. Imagine sun celebrations and twinkling pony stories with this Princess Celestia figure! For ages 3+. $19.99 SRP.

The Princess Celestia figure is available for purchase at HASCON for its “See Now, Buy Now” program where a limited amount of products will be available for purchase at the convention, including a limited quantity of Princess Celestia figures. This will give fans a chance to buy the figure BEFORE the product officially hits shelves in Spring 2018.


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MY LITTLE PONY EQUESTRIA GIRLS CLASSIC DOLL ASSORTMENT I & II

Imagine fun, fashion-forward scenes with friends from Canterlot High…in a brand new look for Spring 2018! Inspired by entertainment, the 7 dolls in the My Little Pony Equestria Girls Classic Doll Assortment I and II look true-to-character. Each doll is wearing a personality-inspired classic outfit: Applejack comes in a country chic outfit, complete with cowboy boots; Rarity rocks a runway look with a gem-printed, shiny top, and shiny jewelry accessories to match; Pinkie Pie wears a fun party dress with party balloons printed on top; Sunset Shimmer shows off her edgy style with a studded-faux leather vest and trendy ankle boots, Fluttershy wears a flowy dress and sandals fit for tending to animals in a garden, while Rainbow Dash sports bright colored bracelets, shoes, and leggings with funky stripes to match her wild and adventurous streak and Twilight Sparkle wears a more conservative and studious look with a trendy glasses accessory. Every outfit incorporates their cutie mark…with lots of fashionable flair! The dolls are 11-inches tall with long, styled hair and 7 points of articulation for creating lifelike friendship moments! Each sold separately.

MLP Review: “Daring Done?”

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A.K. Yearling retiring? Not on Rainbow Dash’s watch! She and Pinkie Pie travel to A.K.’s home to find out what is going on. What is going on is that Daring Do is getting a negative rap in a village of Somnambula Southern Equestria where she is accused of wrecking a statue of Somnambula among other things while on her adventures.

The three travel to try and clear her name and come across a hooded figure (read: Dr. Caballeron) who is spreading the story of Daring Do’s supposed recklessness. We get to hear the Legend of Somnambula and how she defeated a sphinx through hope (Subliminal message**Read Legends of Magic #5**end subliminal message).

When Rainbow confronts the hooded figure at the statue, Caballeron reveals himself and takes Dash to the temple “thanking her” for breaking Daring Do’s spirit. Just as Rainbow is about to sink into a pit of slime (because TV-Y), Pinkie reminds Daring Do that she would never let anything happen to Rainbow and they use the steam vents below to rescue Rainbow Dash.

Caballeron’s plan was to defame Daring Do so he could carry out his deeds uninterrupted such as pilfering the village of its glowpaz. Caballeron is chased off and A.K. Yearling will not be retiring after all.

The moral is supposed to be to never lose hope as was the case with Somnambula in the legend when things don’t go as intended. It’s a good lesson, but the episode is bit too predictable in its setup. You could tell it was Caballeron under the hood. The episode is still enjoyable, but it suffers from predictability if you have seen the previous episodes with Daring Do.

GRADE: B

StatManDan

MLP Episode Review: “To Change a Changeling”

In this episode, Starlight and Trixie pay a surprise visit to Thorax in the Changeling Kingdom. However, the “welcoming committee” is Pharnyx bagging them to brother Thorax. Pharnyx has yet to fully reform preferring the old ways of the hive. Most of the other changelings have reformed (thanks to a more assertive Thorax with advice from Ember), but Pharnyx is the last holdout.

Starlight and Trixie try to reform him, but the former starts to think it’s a lost cause and that Thorax will eventually have to chase him out of the hive since no one else likes him. Starlight then impulsively alters a trail of leaves to lure a maulwurf so the hive can see Pharnyx’s good side in his role as a protector like he was for Thorax at an early age. However, Pharnyx apparently has left and the maulwurf is on his way.

Thorax, Starlight, and Trixie go after Pharnyx to see him battling the maulwurf, but is overpowered. Two changelings and two magical ponies is not enough either. The rest of the hive, initially unmoved by Starlight’s speech, is almost there. Ultimately, Pharnyx comes up with the solution by getting the maulwurf to keep hitting itself and retreating. Pharnyx ultimately transforms and is welcomed back into the hive.

This was a very good episode. You have a complicated character in Pharnyx who yearns for the old changeling ways, but yet is still interested in the hive’s safety. Thorax is really good here in not just converting the kingdom into something out of “The Office” in terms of activities, but in admonishing Starlight for altering the trail. It did work ultimately, but it is another impulsive move that could have backfired horribly. And then there’s the dynamic between Starlight and Trixie which is very solid.

Trixie is her usually hammy self while Starlight has to play the straight pony. This has become quite the partnership as the show has progressed and I wouldn’t mind more of this.

So overall, this was a very good episode thanks to the humor and the dynamics between the changeling brothers and between Starlight and Trixie.

GRADE: A-

StatManDan

MLP Review: “Campfire Tales”

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Gather around as we expand on the Legends of Magic comic series, Tales 2-4. It’s the annual Big Sister/Little Sister campout to Winsome Falls. However, their campsite is disrupted by a swarm of fly-ders and the sisters have to retreat inside a cave. There, they start to tell campfire stories to pass the time until the fly-ders move on.

Applejack is first by telling the story of Rockhoof (from Legends of Magic #2) and his origins and how he joined the Mighty Helm. Rockhoof gained his mighty strength by digging a trench to redirect the flow of lava from an erupted volcano to save his village. Apple Bloom was really excited by this tale.

Next up is Rarity and she tells the story of Mistmane (Legends of Magic #3) and how she sacrificed her own beauty to save her kingdom. Finally, after Rainbow Dash prevents the fly-ders from coming into the cave by blocking the entrance, she tells the story of Flash Magnus (Legends of Magic #4) and how he braved past a couple of dragons to rescue a pair of comrades.

After making the best of the situation, the CMC and their respective big sisters take the back route and discover a shortcut to Winsome Falls. That’s a bit contrived, but the rest of this episode was quite fascinating.

Every since Issue #51 of the main series, the direction has been to link much closer to the main series in Season Seven. That apparently holds true with the Legends of Magic series and the ever present world building even at this stage of the series. If you have seen the three issues in question, you at least have an idea of all three. If not, I’ll post after the grade (WARNING: SPOILERS!). But seriously, do read the comics. Some of them could well have been episodes on the show—especially some of the early issues.

The best of the three was the story of Mistmane with the scenery which seems to inspired from Ancient Japan as well as the Double Dragon battle between Mistmane and Sable Spirit.

Overall, this was a pleasant episode, as these flashbacks to a different usually are, and a nice tie-in to the comics which was promised just prior to the start of Season Seven.

GRADE: A-

StatManDan

WARNING: COMIC SPOILERS BELOW! If you do not wish to be spoiled by the synopses of these comics, look away now.

Read more →

MLP Review: “Triple Threat”

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This reminded me of a “Brady Bunch” episode once. Anyway, Spike has invited Dragon Lord Ember to Ponyville—as well as Changeling pack leader Thorax. The former is seeking friendship advice from Spike since the dragons’ competitive nature is a bit of hindrance. The latter wants to talk to Spike because he’s having a hard time with a pack of changelings who still prefer to feed off love. Spike is deathly afraid that neither will get along with each other and cause a war. This becomes Spike’s friendship problem to solve.

So, Spike (with the help of Twilight and Starlight) go out of their way to make sure Ember and Thorax do not see each other. After several awkward moments, the Thorax and Ember meet each other and nearly come to blows before Spike admits that trying to keep them apart fearing they would not get along. Ember thinking that because she’s “bad at friendship” and Thorax thinking that he may be too soft.

Actually, Thorax and Ember do get along on their own. Ember gives Thorax a lesson on being more assertive when enforcing rules of his pack and Thorax giving Ember lessons about talking about her feelings (what she didn’t like to do in “Gauntlet of Fire”). And then Spike learns a lesson about trusting his friends would get along with each other and his scales glow which means his friendship problem is solved.

About those awkward moments, some of them were funny. For example, Ember getting used to Pony customs and also mistaking Starlight and Twilight with each other. Of course, Twilight’s scene with the chairs was funny as well. However, this whole episode was weird with one awkward moment after another. It’s when Thorax and Ember have time alone that they start to click. It’s about giving them space to learn friendship and that was something Spike (and indirectly Twilight and Starlight) was not giving them. They are actually good in this episode, it’s Spike that was a bit iffy until late.

Nevertheless, it’s not a terrible episode, it’s good because of and despite some awkward moments from all the characters involved.

GRADE: B

StatManDan

Follow-Up on “Fame and Misfortune”

So yes, “Fame and Misfortune” is a controversial episode for a number of reasons. Not the least of which is how the episode might have been targeting certain fans who are overly nitpicking, super judgmental, and basically being a “Quibble Pants” (pun and reference to “Stranger Than Fan Fiction” intended).

Let’s set something straight right off the bat. This is not targeting the fandom as a whole. Most fans do appreciate the show for what it is and there are fans that appreciate the show for displaying the Mane Six’s flaws and how the develop over time. No pony is perfect and the song did a great job in expressing that. But yes, some in the fandom do treat and over-analyze the show like it were the NFL or [insert Oscar-winning film here]. It is not either of those things.

There is also the lesson for the show staff in the episode. While they may not be able to change certain people’s attitudes towards episodes (and towards themselves occasionally), they can change the way they deal with such criticism. Granted, that didn’t occur in the episode until late, but it is still a good lesson.

Twilight had the best of intention about publishing the journal, but the best laid plans of mice and ponies go often askew. That leads to another frustration about the episode and the show as a whole—that fans ignore the lessons from the episode in favor of being overly critical and/or, worse, confronting show staff on social media about it. That is something I have addressed before and something I’ll likely have to address again.

Should we take the lessons from the show a bit more to heart? Actually, look around the world for a minute and answer that question yourself. Also, ask yourself this, “Why have so many people, both then and now, been drawn to the show to begin with?” I’ve also said previously that sometimes we need a reminder of why we watch this show to begin with.

I was at BronyCon last weekend I cannot help but feel that despite there not being as many people as there were the last two years, there was still a feeling of great positivity even if it was mostly negative outside the Baltimore Convention Center. Ask yourself this question: Why should “Friendship is Magic” be criticized for trying to teach morals while shows like “The Simpsons” and “Family Guy” are lionized for their cynicism and boorish “humor”.

Yes, there are always consequences when you put your story/thoughts out that that someone will disagree with you and not be the most mature about it. Indeed, there are ways for me to deal with that and some are most professional than others, but just remember that the episode in question was not tarring the fandom as a whole with the same brush. Most fans are appreciative of the show and have been inspired from the show and fan content it has spun off. (One frequent comment at BronyCon last weekend was how there was so much talent around.) There are prices to being famous, but some people can be taxing excessively through being super judgmental.

StatManDan